Bengal slow loris reasons for endangerment

The Bengal slow loris feeds on plant exudates such as sapgumsresinsand latexesparticularly those from the family Fabaceae. Demand the government of Bangladesh enforce tougher regulations on deforestation to protect the home of the endangered Bengal slow loris.

In the wild envenomation occurs from intraspecific competition; whereby two slow lorises fight for mates, food or territory. In north-eastern India, one of the key causes of habitat loss is a practice known as jhum, whereby hillside forest is burnt in order to create fertile agricultural land.

CAN YOU TELL BENGAL SLOW LORIS AND PYGMY LORIS APART?

Deforestation has robbed the species of so much land and food that it has no choice but to encroach on more densely populated areas and localities. Possessing a round, slightly startled looking, flat face, and wet nose, the Bengal slow loris is between 27 and 36 centimetres in length and weighs from 1 to 2 kilograms.

The preferred habitats of the Bengal slow loris range across tropical and subtropical regions, and include evergreen and semi-evergreen rainforests with forest edges and continuous, dense canopies. Posted by Keri Ann Target: Cryptic colouration, sleeping during the day, and slow movement all help the Bengal slow loris to avoid predators.

Even though the species does not have keeled nails, it will scrape the plant, actively breaking its surface; this behavior resembles that of marmosets and the fork-marked lemurs. Top Bengal slow loris conservation In response to the high levels of trade in loris species, the Bengal slow loris was transferred in from the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species CITES Appendix II, where commercial trade is permitted, to Appendix I, making all international trade in this species illegal.

Little is known about the social structure of slow lorises, but they generally spend most of the night foraging alone.

The bastard myrobala Terminalia belericaa deciduous tree common in Southeast Asia, is a preferred source for exudates, [22] but it has also been observed taking plant exudates from a number of families: Slow loris saliva has been shown to be cytotoxic to human skin cells in laboratory experiments without the admix of BGE.

They lack the opsin gene that would allow them to detect short wavelength light, which includes the colors blue and green.

It is thought all nine recognised species of this small-bodied nocturnal primate are venomous. They cannot live in the lowlands since moderate heat is dangerous to them.

During the day, the Bengal slow loris curls up into a ball and sleeps in the trees, usually in cavities in trees or dense cover. The female species only has offspring every few years.

Endangered Bengal Slow Loris disappearing due to massive deforestation

Furthermore, secondary toxins may be introduced from the consumption of wild food, augmenting the toxicity. Both sexes are approximately the same size. Rainy, mountainous areas are their preferred habitat, and they remain in these areas throughout the winter, too. Rampant deforestation has robbed it of its food and shelter.

Slow loris venom was known in folklore in their host countries throughout southeast Asia for centuries; but dismissed by western science until the s. More recently, researchers have documented the belief that the consumption of loris meat was an aphrodisiac that improves "male power".

Once disturbed, they immediately stop moving and remain motionless. Before stashing their offspring in a secure location, female slow lorises will lick their brachial glands, and then groom their young with their toothcomb, depositing the toxin on their fur.

In addition, and as a result of development in and around Bengal slow loris habitat, it has been recorded that numerous individuals are killed by vehicles while crossing roads Hunted and poached for the supposed medicinal qualities of its various body parts.

In response to the high levels of trade in loris species, the Bengal slow loris was transferred in from the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES) Appendix II, where commercial trade is permitted, to Appendix I, making all international trade in this species illegal.

The Bengal slow loris (Nycticebus bengalensis) or northern slow loris is a strepsirrhine primate and a species of slow loris native to the Indian subcontinent and Indochina. Its geographic range is larger than that of any other slow loris species. The Bengal Slow Loris (Nycticebus bengalensis) is a species of concern belonging in the species group "mammals" and found in the following area(s): Bangladesh, Cambodia, China, India, Laos, Myanmar, Thailand, Vietnam.

This species is also known by the following name(s): Northern Slow Loris, N. cinereus, N. incanus, N. tenasserimensis.

The endangered Bengal slow loris is facing extinction because rampant deforestation is destroying its natural habitat. The slow loris has been internationally recognized as an endangered species for well over four decades. The Bengal Slow Loris (Nycticebus bengalensis) is a species of concern belonging in the species group "mammals" and found in the following area(s): Bangladesh, Cambodia, China, India, Laos, Myanmar, Thailand, Vietnam.

This species is also known by the following name(s): Northern Slow Loris, N. cinereus, N. incanus, N. tenasserimensis. The Bengal Slow Loris is an endangered species that without it’s existence, the ecosystem in which it resides will fall into an unhealthy disaster.

Bengal slow loris

One may ask why this species is in the endangered list and the answer to that varies widely.

Bengal slow loris reasons for endangerment
Rated 0/5 based on 26 review
CAN YOU TELL BENGAL SLOW LORIS AND PYGMY LORIS APART? - Endangered Primate Rescue Center